Juan Balleza

Juan Balleza joined the United States Marine Corps at the beginning of his senior year of high school at Fox Tech in San Antonio, Texas. Juan graduated in May of 1950, one month prior to the outset of the Korean War. In July of 1950, Juan was called to active duty and found himself quickly mobilized. In August, he and fellow Marines were transported to Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton in California. While at Camp Pendleton he received three weeks of training as an 0311 Infantryman.

Juan’s first combat engagement occurred In late September of 1950. As part of the 1st Battalion, 7th Marines, Juan participated in the Second Battle of Seoul which resulted in the recapture of Seoul by United Nations forces.

Subsequent to his engagement in the Second Battle of Seoul, in October of 1950, Juan’s battalion and regiment moved into North Korea. In late November and December of 1950, amid bitter cold, Juan fought in the Battle of the Chosin Reservoir.

After his service, Juan returned to San Antonio.

In 2001, Juan revisited South Korea and was amazed by the modernization of the country as well as the enduring thankfulness of the South Korean people.

Comments

Likes 0

You must be a registered user to comment or like - please register to join us!

Display: Grid Detailed

Interview, July 14, 2018

Juan Balleza interview, Luby’s Restaurant, San Antonio, Texas.

Show All »

Interview, July 14, 2018

USS Bayfield, July 1949

Photo provided by Juan Balleza of three Marines. Juan stands center with Alving G. Padilla, Jr., my grandfather, to his left and Freddy De La Rosa to his right.

Show All »

USS Bayfield, July 1949

Korean War - Key Events

January 17, 1950

North Korean leader Kim Il-Sung proposes the “liberation” of South Korea to Soviet officials. Weeks of telegram exchanges between Beijing, Moscow, and P’yŏngyang follow, and by early spring Kim has secured assurances of support for the invasion from Soviet premier Joseph Stalin and Chinese leader Mao Zedong.

These events are taken from the Encyclopedia Britannica

New Report

Close